5 - 6 Dec 2017 business design centre, london

2017 Conference Programme

Day One - 5th December 2017

Day Two - 6th December 2017

Day One - 5th December 2017

9:15 - 9:30

Introduction to the conference

9:30 - 10:15

Opening Keynote
Ziyad Marar, President, Global Publishing, SAGE Publishing
 Ziyad will speak about how the rise of big data nad new technology is tranforming the very nature of social research, and how was as an industry can respond to this phenomenon, both tactically and strategically.
To handle the threats and to respond to the opportunity in this area requires fresh thinking, ranging from organisational culture to the relationships we have as an industry with a whole host of new actors. Ziyad will also walk through some of the innovations and approaches Sage Publishing plan to implement through building, buying, partnering or investing.

10:15-10:30

Break

10:30-11:30

Valuing truth in the age of fake – plenary session
Speaker: Fiona Bradley, Deputy Executive Director, RLUK

Panellists:
Jonathan Clark, Managing Agent, International DOI Foundation
Paul Evans, CEO, Substantive Media
Arthur Weiss, Managing Director, AWARE

Fiona Bradley, Deputy Executive Director, RLUK
People have always needed skills to distinguish spin from facts, and misinformation from selectivity. As
a profession committed to access to information, libraries are concerned about efforts to de ne ‘fake news’ that could have an unintended impact or chilling effect on our ability to provide this. The speed with which we communicate through social media and disseminate information makes for ethical debates and challenges in how we regulate the media, verify images and check facts, and in how machines and algorithms present information to us. Fiona will re ect on the challenges of this environment, and how libraries are responding.

 

How do I know what’s what and who’s who?
Jonathan Clark, Managing Agent, International DOI Foundation
In the digital world there is a need to unambiguously determine what a resource is and where it can be found in a way that is persistent over time. Thankfully, there are established systems such as DOI, Handle and URN:NBN that help meet this need. But how do I know if a particular Persistent Identifier System can be trusted or not? And perhaps more to the point, how does my machine know? Besides what exactly does “persistent” mean anyway? Is it the identifier or the resource it points to? Or both? And what about the problem of “content drift”, where a resource has somehow changed over time and may or may not be what it once was? In the diverse digital world how do I really know what’s what and who’s who? Who and what can I trust? These are key questions for anyone using persistent identifiers, especially in the publishing and research data communities. This presentation will present the latest developments and thinking around trust and provenance in context of persistent identifiers.

 

Is branded content set to swallow editorial?
Paul Evans,CEO, Substansive Media
Branded content, content marketing, native content – call it what you will – has challenged the separation between editorial and advertising functions across the media landscape, threatening to undermine a demarcation that has been at the heart of media governance for decades. But does this trend mean better or worse information quality and integrity for individual consumers? With the UK parliament discussing media and marketing regulation pertaining to this issue as we speak, the topic should be high on the agenda of information creators, publishers and users. New approaches are proliferating and without a clear regulatory framework, the risk is run that the big questions raised are answered by the whims of the market, not by considered, expert response. As an editorial and marketing professional of many years – now responsible for changing the commercial approach of Reader’s Digest, the quintessential trusted brand, to a more native approach – I would like to discuss the changes I’ve seen in the industry and raise the crucial questions the information community needs to contend with at this juncture. As media, communications and advertising increasingly converge, a failure by the information community to reach an understanding of acceptable standards and practices could see them become inextricable over the next handful of years. What can be done to raise consumer awareness of new approaches to content? What can be done to change the incentives of content creators towards quality, rather than short-term gain? How can ‘clickable’ content be supplanted by ‘readable’ content and is that what consumers want? In a post-GDPR world, does the shift from a ‘push’ to a ‘pull’ information model force commercial messages into content? Where does this shift leave traditional publishers, producers and editors? If editorial becomes an adjunct to commercial messaging and the money follows, does control of mass communication pass from publishers to content marketers? Is branded content, by it’s very nature, insidiously duplicitous or is it a triumph of consumer choice meaning individuals can create a market of one in which they need only read about the brands in which they have genuine interest?

 

The truth is out there – or is it? Competitive & Marketing Intelligence Research & “Fake” information
Arthur Weiss, Managing Director, AWARE
Business decisions depend on accurate intelligence. Decisions made using false, or poor, information are likely to be damaging to corporate profitability. Verifying what is true and what is fake should be a key skill for anybody involved in business strategy – especially as it is in the interest for companies to mislead or confuse competitors while at the same time encouraging investors. Examples such as Theranos’s promised technology, once seen as a multi-billion dollar investment opportunity have turned out to be fake. Clearing away the smoke & mirrors to identify the truth or get as close to the truth as possible is becoming more important as people increasingly depend on online information for decision-making.

11:30 - 11:45

Break

11:45 - 12:45

Birth of the new infotech
Vicky Hampshire, Vice President of Business Development, Yewno
Tahir Mansoori, Founder and Director of R&D, Wizdom.ai
Sadia Shahid, Head of Business Development, Wizdom.ai
David Smith, Head of Product Solutions, Institution of Engineering and Technology

For content owners, brokers and aggregators, technology is increasingly more about exploiting strategic assets than access and entitlement. With semantic enrichment at the heart of the new infotech, this session will look at its impact on the way information is presented and consumed.

 

How AI can transform publishing work flows for efficiencies and new insights
Vicky Hampshire, Vice President of Business Development, Yewno
How are leading publishers and repositories using cutting-edge AI technologies to address their categorisation and work ow challenges? Can these technologies help overcome the limitations of insuf cient metadata? Vicky will give an overview of the potential that AI has to accelerate growth in the publishing industry. She’ll also demonstrate AI tools for publishers, explaining how AI transcends limitations imposed by poor metadata, and exploring opportunities that AI presents to the industry.

 

Object Oriented Publishing Anyone?
David Smith,
Head of Product Solutions, Instution of Engineering and Technology
We live interesting scholarly times. On the one hand, our users “just want the pdf” thank-you very much. On the other, they want machine readable documents; the data behind all the research; Full protocols for replication; Machine builds for computer code; And so on and so on. This doesn’t sit too well with the several hundred year old journal article format; nor the (slightly newer) journal/book platforms that we all know and love. So, inspired by the Amazon and Microsoft cloud platforms, this talk is going to imagine a world of publishing objects that might make up, or consume the scholarly research output of the future.

11:45 - 12:45

Whose research is it, anyway?
David Worlock, David Worlock Digital Strategy
Phill Jones, PhD, Director of Publishing Innovation, Digital Science Consultancy

More speakers to be announced

With researchers increasingly able to share information and ideas, participate in discussions and embark
on collaborations through Scienti c Collaboration Networks (SCNs) and other networked platforms, do
we need to rethink the way rights are protected and managed? In this session, we’ll review the legal issues at play, describe the current marketplace and hear from an institutional perspective how intellectual property issues in uence the library’s activities.

 

Maintaining the integrity of knowledge in a networked world
David Warlock,
David Warlock Digital Strategy
While the purpose of research is to enhance and advance the discipline being researched, the objective of researchers must be to advance their careers and bring in new funding. With the networked world bringing profound shocks as well as critical advantages to the researcher, David will ask whether IP matters anymore and talk about how the integrity of the knowledge can be preserved. By looking at the rise of the scholarly networks and hearing from expert witnesses, he’ll look at how the real authors of research can remain in control and avoid IP theft.

12:45 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 14:45

Afternoon Keynote
Alfred Rollington, CEO, Cyber Security Intelligence

Digital Shock – The 4th industrial revolution
Alfred Rolington, CEO, Cyber Security Intelligence Ltd
We are at the outset of an electronic revolution that will substantially alter our society and change the way most people live. Alfred will talk about how this 4th Industrial Revolution, driven by emerging technologies – such as cognitive electronics, advanced analysis, nanotechnology, biotechnology, and quantum computing – will radically alter our individual, national and global connections, our jobs, personal lives and electronic systems.

14:45 - 15:00

Break

15:00 - 16:00

Open Science, Open Futures?
Wilma van Wezenbeek, Director, TU Delft Library
Professor Rosalind Smyth, ICH Director, Great Ormond Street Hospital 
Hannah Hope, Open Access, Welcome

The Open movement is creating the conditions for the evolution of new models for scienti c research. This session will review how open initiatives are emerging at the interface between the political mandates of institutions and the changing expectations of researchers.

 

The three challenges of Open Science
Wilma van Wezenbeek, Director, TU Delft Library
As author of the National Plan Open Science of the Netherlands, Wilma will talk through the ambitions that form part of the plan, while also explaining what the Netherlands and TU Delft, (where she is Library Director) are doing to delivery full open access by 2020. Wilma will also talk about how to make research data optimally suitable for reuse and how to provide recognition of and appreciation for researchers in the open science world.

From open access to open research
Hannah Hope,
Open Research Co-ordinator, Wellcome
As a global research foundation, Wellcome is dedicated to ensuring that the outputs of the research it funds – including publications, data, code and materials – can be accessed and used in ways that will maximise the resulting health benefits. In this talk Hannah will provide an overview of Wellcome’s work in this area, the advances that have been made and the challenges remaining to supporting an open research culture within the research communities that it supports.

15:00 - 16:00

Welcome to the New Impact
Dan Pollock, Senior Analyst, Delta Think
Dan Filby, CEO, Highwire
Kathy Christian, CEO, Altmetric

How do we evaluate differing notions of impact in the changing research landscape? Impact factors continue to be the primary mark used to evaluate career progression, journal quality and funding outputs. However, today’s generation of researchers are also comfortable with alt.metrics and the ability to drive their own impact. How will impact evolve in the near future?

 

New tools for measuring impact – how publishers are gaining deeper insight
Dan Filby, CEO, Highwire
New tools and faster access to vast data warehouses of user and bibliometric data provide a more sophisticated approach to understanding impact. Dan will look at how publishers are evaluating gaining deeper insights through all stages of publishing
to measure the impact of business and editorial decisions. He’ll also talk about how the application of data science techniques, including machine learning and predictive analytics, combined with detailed usage data delivers business intelligence and actionable feedback.

 

Stop looking in the rearview mirror – why analytics are critical all year
Dan Pollock, Senior Analyst, Delta Think
As publishers, we believe we’re keenly aware of the ins and outs of our markets. But how much do we really know about our markets and how much of that knowledge can be applied in a systematic way that allows us to tangibly impact our business planning? Dan shows how utilising data in real-time on a regular basis can help organisations predict fast-moving trends and how data used regularly can also highlight counter-intuitive trends – knowledge scholarly communications stakeholders should not be without.

 

Kathy Christian, CEO, Altmetric
How are academics, press offices and other stakeholders communicating their research online, what are they doing right or wrong, and what roles do libraries, publishers and funders have to play? One way to help answer these questions is to take a look at the data surrounding the sharing, discussion and citation of books and articles online. We’ll do that in this talk, with a focus on what trends we’ve seen so far in 2017.

To download the conference programme, click here

For more information on our speakers and keynotes, click here

To download the LII 2017 brochure, click here

Day Two - 6th December 2017

9:30 - 10:15

Opening Keynote - Driving forward the future of innovation through entrepreneurship
Professor Tim Dafforn, Chief Entrepreneurial Advisor, Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and Professor of Biotech at the University of Birmingham

Tim will talk about driving productivity and growth in the UK economy through increased investment in innovation. Looking beyond Brexit, how can the UK secure involvement in European R&D programmes after 2020, while also catalysing the growth of its entrepreneurial culture?

10:15 - 10:30

Break

10:30 - 11:30

Facing the realities of uncertainty - plenary session
Chris Tyler, Director, Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology
Cath Cotton, CEO, Federation of European Microbiological Societies

Further panelists to be announced

In this panel session, our speakers will assess the impact on the information industry of the political and economic events that have dominated our news agenda in 2017. From Brexit to Trump and from climate change to piracy, our panel will assess the game-changing new realities the information world faces.

Cath Cotton, CEO, Federation of European Microbiological Societies
The changes and uncertainties facing today’s information industry are many – and the jury remains out with respect to some directions of travel. Within this context, the ability of the global scholarly society sector to thrive will depend on a combination of both increasing organizational agility and identifying specific roles and functions across a wider knowledge exchange system. With a view to developing more effective knowledge flows to impact, Cath will explore what such a system might look like and where its current stakeholders would fit in.

11:30 - 11:45

Break

11:45 - 12:45

New tribes, changing realities
Jo McShea, VP & Lead Analyst, Outsell
Andrew Pitts, Managing Director, Publisher Solutions International
Michael Head, Senior Research Fellow, University of Southampton

The rise to prominence in the workplace of millennials and Generation C tribes is shifting the expectations of information users. In this session, we’ll look at the demographics and discuss how these new tribes are impacting information consumption.

 

From product-centric to user-centric – how the roles are reversing for publishers
Jo McShea, VP & Lead Analyst, Outsell
For decades publishers determined how users consume content. The roles are now reversed with information providers seeing the shift from a product-centric view to a user-centric perspective. Jo will talk about this development and how wider society behaviours around technology and information consumption, as well as demographic changes, are driving organisational change, product development and investment strategies across the information industry as the consumerisation of professional content markets continues at a rapid pace.

 

Who’s been eating my porridge? Identifying the content thieves
Andrew Pitts, Managing Director, Publisher Solutions International
Over a few hours one single weekend in 2017, intruders stole 9,298 journal articles of 134 publishers from just one UK university library. Who did it, how and why? How can we stop them from doing it again? Andrew will describe the means, motive and opportunity of a crime that repeats almost daily and which represents a serious threat to our industry.

11:45 - 12:45

The AI and machine learning renaissance - a revolution in waiting
Klaus Kater, Managing Partner, Deep Search Nine
Haralambos Marmanis, CTO/VP, Copyright Clearance Center
Borislav Popov, Head of Semantic Annotation and Search, Ontotext

The long-heralded impact of AI is beginning to transform information markets. Beyond the transformation of content, AI technology is restating the relationship between authors, consumers and brokers. This session will look at how AI is being used to address usage, impact and audience engagement.

 

Moving from the Big Data economy towards the insight economy
Haralambos Marmanis, CTO/VP, Copyright Clearance Center
The era of Big Data has led to a state in which every organisation is now able to collect every single piece of data related to its business, but in many cases, the results have been underwhelming in terms of business value. Haralambos will argue that companies who succeed do not inundate their decision makers with data. Instead, they offer them insights. He’ll talk about making the journey from Big Data to Insights and will review the value of insights as market differentiators.

 

Managing intelligence in the age of automated deep search and web analysis
Klaus Kater, Managing Partner, Deep Search Nine
Many areas of business-critical importance call for research, continuous monitoring, analysis and distribution of collected intelligence within an organisation to support immediate and competent decision making. Klaus will talk about how deep search and web analysis technology is ready to build automated services that go out and collect intelligence automatically in a supervised fashion. He’ll present an architecture for an Intelligence Management System from an organisational and technical perspective and will give real life examples of where it has been applied.

12:45 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 15:00

Dispatches from the university publishing revolution
John Normansell, Productions & Operations Director, Manchester University Press
Lara Speicher, Publishing Manager, UCL Press

With university presses energetically stepping up their efforts to take a more prominent role in the scienti c information chain, we hear from three leading proponents about their aspirations, thinking and the lessons they’ve learnt along the way.

 

Developing the open access university press at UCL
Lara Speicher, Publishing Manager, UCL Press
UCL Press launched in June 2015 as the rst fully open access university press in the UK, representing one of the world’s top 10 universities. Lara will talk about how the press was set up to offer open access monograph publishing as a way to ensure the widest possible dissemination of scholarly research, the take up both from readers and authors, and plans for its next phase of development, which include launching a megajournal and expanding its textbook publishing programme.

 

Implementing a new infrastructure at Manchester University Press
John Normansell, Productions & Operations Director, Manchester University Press
John will talk about a project to introduce a new infrastructure at Manchester University Press, providing a publishing platform, as well as title, metadata and asset management. He’ll speak about the budget, people and data aspects of the project, the challenges around data and management, then nally re ect on what MUP would do differently in the future.

14:00 - 15:00

Meet the up-starts – the publishing start-ups challenging the status quo
Lisa Walton, Executive Editor, Veruscript
Mads Holmen, Founder and CEO, Bibblio
Ginny Hendricks, Founder and Director, Metadata 2020

An emerging generation of publishing start-ups, driven by the new rules of digital commerce, is having a profound impact on our industry. In this session, we showcase some of these start-ups and ask them to talk through their approach and thinking.

 

Delivering quality information products in a world of Spotify, Google and Instagram
Mads Holmen, Founder and CEO, Bibblio
The dramatic changes to the way we all consume media are now increasingly spilling over into other areas of publishing, changing the way content needs to be delivered and discovered. Mads will talk about how to deliver quality information products that engage users in a world of Spotify, Google and Instagram. Learn how they and others are using deep learning to match users to content in increasingly intelligent ways.

 

Decentralising publishing in universities and societies
Lisa Walton, Executive Editor, Veruscript
Lisa will take a look at the driving forces behind the increased move for universities and societies to take control of their own publishing, while also outlining the pros and cons for libraries starting and running their own presses. What are the current barriers and how are they being overcome? Will the increased move into university press publishing help decentralise publishing and rebalance the landscape in favour of the institutions conducting the research being published?

 

Collaboration to facilitate discovery – What discoveries are we missing without good metadata?
Ginny Hendricks, Founder & Director, Metadata 2020
All scholarly communications participants share the end goal of conducting or facilitating and communicating research that is discoverable, with proper attribution given, in a format that can be easily evaluated. A group of organisations from all over the world (including Crossref, DataCite, ORCID, OpenAIRE, California Digital Library, Wikimedia, and OCLC amongst others) have joined forces to rally and support the community around this critical issue in scholarly communications: sharing richer metadata. Ginny will talk about this initiative, demonstrating the uses of metadata for researchers through a series of use cases.

15:00 - 15:15

Break

15:15 - 16:00

Closing keynote - Publishing to address grand societal challenges
Nicola Jones, Head of Publishing for Grand Challenges, Springer Nature

Publishing to address grand societal challenges

The world is facing complex and interconnected issues like sustainability, resource scarcity, global health, and inequality. These ‘grand challenges’ affect society both globally and locally. To solve these, researchers must collaborate across disciplinary boundaries, and connect with policymakers and practitioners. Nicola will discuss the ways publishers can contribute to the development of solutions to these challenges.

16:00

Springer Nature drinks reception

Springer Nature invites you to its drinks reception. Take the opportunity to engage with Springer Nature and other information industry professionals to improve outcomes in research, education and business.

To download the conference programme, click here

For more information on our speakers and keynotes, click here

To download the LII 2017 brochure, click here